Great Resource for Christian Parents of Kids With Special Needs

Thereasa Winnett

5 Stars

March 2, 2016

Over the last few years I have become a fan of Nick Vujicic. If you aren’t aware of him, Nick was born without arms or legs. With a disability that for most people would have meant their world is very small, Nick has become a minister, preacher, speaker and advocate for those with special needs all over the world. If you want to be inspired to overcome just about anything in your life, read his books about his life.

As I learned more about Nick, I often said I wanted to meet his parents. It was obvious they have to be very special people to have raised a son who has not allowed his disabilities to define or narrow his life. Someone must have heard me, because his father Boris Vujicic has just written a new book, Raising the Perfectly Imperfect Child.

Although as a fan I am obviously a bit biased, I have to say I loved this book! The author does an excellent job explaining what he and his wife did in raising Nick while still acknowledging that every child with special needs is unique. He is empathetic and makes it clear that in some ways their circumstances were easier than those of others with children who have special needs.

On the other hand, Vujicic doesn’t pull any punches. He is brutally honest about the wide range of emotions they experienced when they realized at the birth of Nick he had no arms and legs. They address how their parents would not really allow them to even consider the idea of not raising Nick themselves. For those not coming from a Christian perspective, that section may seem harsh, but I appreciated the reality and the godliness of their attitudes.

Honestly, much of the advice the author gives is really good marriage and parenting advice for any parent, regardless of how “normal” their child may be. I love that he takes the time to really discuss the pressures having a child with special needs can put on a marriage and on siblings. He gives very practical advice for addressing those issues based on what they learned over the years.

Really only a small portion of the book goes into detail about the medical and adaptive things they did to address Nick’s specific disability. Evidently it is very rare, so I can understand the balance needed to help that handful of people and not lose readers who have children with very different special needs.

Personally, I would have wanted to read this book even if I weren’t a parent. It is just so interesting to read about their journey from shock and despair to joy and thankfulness. I think any parent will find good solid advice for their marriage and raising any child within its pages.

Parents, especially those who have just learned their child has special needs, will probably get the most from this book. Having never been through the experience, I can only try to imagine what it would be like. From that viewpoint, I think I would find the things he writes about comforting and helpful.

Be warned though. While the author is very empathetic, he also definitely has a “pull yourselves up by your bootstraps” “with God’s help we can make anything work” personality. If you are looking for someone to give you a free pass to continue to mourn and not begin working within your situation, you aren’t going to get that from Vujicic. And in my opinion, that’s probably a very good and godly thing.

 

 

A copy of this book was given to me for free in exchange for my honest review