A Father-Son Rivalry

Michael Medlen

3 Stars

October 28, 2017

I’ll just come right out and say it. Paul Teutul Jr. and His father have what many will call a father-son rivalry. Both believe they’re right, and yet we only get one side of the story. And here in The Build by the son, often referred to as Junior, we see a man who isn’t beset by greed or jealousy but by a burning desire to be free of oppression. This is my review

Junior is shown as a man of the principle of faith. He’s raised in a Christian household but details accounts of living with an acholic father. That man is Paul Sr., tho you may know him more from his appearance on the show American Choppers that aired on Discovery between 2002 to 2012.

Paul Sr. is the dude with the handlebar mustache and usually the one yelling at the circus of employees that help him build classic customized choppers in the Orange County area.

Junior was his right-hand man and the real star of the show. While most will acknowledge his own hand in the company’s success, Junior recounts how he never felt he appreciated by the man who created the business.

This leads to a meltdown on the air in which Junior gets fired by his dad.

But this doesn’t deter him.

See, Junior was the real brains behind the jaw-dropping designs on the show. Known for his Black Widow bike, Junior has the ability to create something unique and watch that vision become a reality.

So when his father ends up firing him, Junior realizes this is his chance to start his own business, which leads up to him marrying his wife and realizing how much better his life is once he gets out of his parent’s reach.

I’ll be honest. The faith aspects of the book, while inspiring, are nothing new. I guess that comes with the terrain of the Christian faith. Believe in God and great things will happen. That much we know from the testimony.

But the authors here seem to have nothing new to add other than Junior’s own testimony, which while great, hardly creates a stirring read.

But there is comfort in knowing that even in times of great struggle, hope can be found in independence and freedom that Junior finds when he strikes out on his own. Yes, he is a victim of circumstances beyond his control, but that hardly stops him.

The Build is a pretty straightforward account of Junior’s early 20s and his struggles but ends on a high note. In the midst of defeat, Junior beats his dad in a chopper competition on live TV. But not to be outdone by a winner’s mentality, Junior still has the heart to give his dad a hug and tell he loves him.

That to me is what makes The Build worth the read. Even in our turmoil, we can still love each other.